Posts Tagged ‘strike’

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Up to a million U.K. public sector workers—firefighters, librarians, teachers, and council staff—are expected to participate in today’s strike.

Britain is to witness the biggest round of industrial action for three years as teachers and firefighters join care workers, refuse collectors, librarians and other civil servants at picket lines and rallies across the country. . .

Dave Prentis, general secretary of Unison, representing many of the country’s lowest paid workers, told the BBC: “Something has got to give – enough is enough.

“We’ve got 300,000 now on zero-hours contracts, we’ve got a million workers in local government earning below the living wage that Boris Johnson and others talk about, and people are saying: ‘We cannot go through another three years of this pay restraint.'”

Union leaders say there will be more than 50 marches and rallies across England and Wales including a protest that will end in a rally at Trafalgar Square, London. There will also be scores of picket lines at schools, council offices, depots and fire stations across England and Wales.

 

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Labor union Verdi has called on workers at German warehouses of online retailer Amazon.com to extend their strikes over pay and working conditions on Thursday and Friday of this week.

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Yesterday, the fast-food strikes that have been spreading around the United States went global. Workers at restaurants like Burger King, McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and KFC walked off their jobs in 230 cities around the world to demand a minimum wage of $15 an hour and the right to form a union without retaliation. Strikers protested in 150 US cities, from New York to Los Angeles, and in 80 foreign cities, from Casablanca to Tokyo to Brussels to Buenos Aires.

Currently, the median pay for fast-food workers is just over $9 an hour, or about $18,500 a year. That’s roughly $4,500 lower than the Census Bureau’s poverty threshold level of $23,000 for a family of four.

The “Fight for $15″ campaign started in New York in November 2012, when 200 fast-food workers demanded $15 and the right to form a union without retaliation.

Union organizers say the movement has elevated the debate about inequality in the U.S. and helped raise the minimum wage in some states.

A man lays carnations at the Miners Monument in central Soma, a district in Turkey's western province of Manisa

Turkish unions have called for a national strike today in response to an explosion in a coal mine in the west of the country that has left at least 282 workers dead.

According to Erinç Yeldan,

One of the greatest work-crimes in mining industry occurred in Soma, a little mining village in Western Turkey. At noon-time on Tuesday, May 13, according to witnesses, an electrical fault triggered a transformer to explode causing a large fire in the mine, releasing carbon monoxide and gaseous fumes. (The official cause of the “accident” was still unknown, at this writing, after nearly 30 hours.) Around 800 miners were trapped 2 km underground and 4 km from the exit. At this point, the death toll has already reached 245, with reports of another 100 workers remaining in the mine, yet unreached.

Turkey has possibly the worst safety record in terms of mining accidents and explosions in Europe and the third worst in the world. Since the right-wing Justice and Development Party (AKP) assumed power in 2002, and up to 2011, a 40% increase in work-related accidents has been reported. The death toll from these accidents reached more than 11,000.

Many analysts agree that what lies behind these tragic events is the unregulated and poorly supervised attempts of a corrupt ruling government to push through hasty privatizations and a forced informalization of labour. The Soma mine itself was privatized in 2005. In the heyday of an anti-public sector campaign, the new owners of the plant proudly declared a decline in production costs from the US$120-130 range under the public ownership of State Coal Inc. (TTK) to US$23.80. It was not very long before it became clear that what actually facilitated this ‘miraculous market success’ was the determined evasion of safety standards. On that front, the president of the private company Soma Inc., Mr. Gürkan, was heard boasting, “You can ask ‘what changed in the mine?’ The answer is ‘nothing.’ We simply introduced methods of the private sector only.”

Over this process of “introduction of the methods of the private sector,” average gross daily pay of the miners hovered at 47 TL (approximately US$20), while the existing mine tunnels were extended from 350 m to more than 2.5 km. The dissolution of the Council of Public Inspection by government decree in 2011 was clearly instrumental in reducing the role of formal inspections to no more than friendly visits to the company headquarters, with no attention paid to the actual working conditions in the tunnels.

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Special mention

Student Loans May 11, 2014

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Sometimes, good people who are doing good work get at least some of the recognition they deserve.

That’s why I was pleased to learn that Dwight Billings recently received the Cratis D. Williams/James S. Brown Service Award, the highest honor for service awarded by the Appalachian Studies Association.

In addition to all the accomplishments cited in the article, Billings has also worked with Kate Black to provide a guided tour of some of the significant materials—including the coal miners’ strike of 1931-32—in the Appalachian Collection at the University of Kentucky.

Protest of the day

Posted: 23 April 2014 in Uncategorized
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Dozens of Sherpa guides packed up and abandoned Mount Everest’s base camp Wednesday in honor of 16 of their colleagues killed in the deadliest avalanche recorded on the mountain, an incident that has exposed a great deal of resentment over their working conditions, pay, and treatment.

Tusli Gurung, a guide who was at the base camp on Wednesday, estimated that nearly half the Sherpas had already left.

The walkout is certain to disrupt a climbing season that was already marked by grief following Friday’s disaster. Sherpa guides were hauling climbing gear between camps when a chunk of ice tore loose and triggered an avalanche. Thirteen bodies were recovered and three Sherpas still missing are presumed dead.

“It is just impossible for many of us to continue climbing while there are three of our friends buried in the snow,” said Dorje Sherpa, an experienced Everest guide from the tiny Himalayan community that has become famous for its high-altitude skills and endurance.

“I can’t imagine stepping over them,” he said of the three Sherpa guides who remain buried in ice and snow. . .

The avalanche was triggered when a massive piece of glacier sheared away from the mountain along a section of constantly shifting ice and crevasses known as the Khumbu Icefall — a treacherous area where overhanging immensities of ice as large as 10-story buildings hang over the main route up the mountain.

Special teams of Sherpas, known as Icefall Doctors, fix ropes through what they hope to be the safest paths, and use aluminum ladders to bridge crevasses. But the Khumbu shifts so much that they need to go out every morning — as they were doing when disaster struck Friday — to repair sections that have broken overnight and move the climbing route if needed. . .

While most climbers have to make multiple passes through the Icefall, moving up and down the mountain as they acclimatize and prepare for their summit attempt, Sherpas make the dangerous journey two dozen times or more, carrying supplies and helping clients negotiate the hazardous maze of ice.