Dignify this!

Posted: 17 April 2014 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , ,

surplusvalue

We’ve been over this before but, like a bad penny, it just keeps coming back. . .

Conservatives and liberals seem not to agree about anything these days (as my students often complain). But there is one idea they do share: the wages-system needs to be protected at all costs.

Economists, politicians, and columnists from the two ends of the political spectrum do have different starting points: conservatives believe that workers are at bottom shirkers, and therefore need to be forced off their “dependency” on government programs in order to lower the reward for non-work, while liberals start with the idea that workers today are not being paid enough, at least those at the bottom, and the minimum wage should be raised in order to raise the reward to work.

Yet, while conservatives and liberals have different starting-points, they agree that there is a fundamental dignity in working for someone else. Here’s the liberal version, from Charles Blow:

No one should ever endure the kind of economic humiliation that comes with working a full-time job and making a less-than-living wage.

There is dignity in all work, but that dignity grows dim when the checks are cashed and the coins are counted and still the bills rise higher than the wages.

Most people want to work. It is a basic human desire: to make a way, to provide for one’s self and one’s loved ones, to advance. It is that great hope of tomorrow, better and brighter, in which we can be happy and secure, able to sleep without hunger and wake without worry.

But it is easy to see how people can have that hope thrashed out of them, by having to wrestle with the most wrenching of questions: how to make do when you work for less than you can live on?

Really? A “basic human desire”? We all warn our students about making such sweeping, universal statements—especially when not a shred of evidence is presented. But the problem here is worse. It’s the presumption that people want to work (instead of being forced to work) and that working is somehow making one’s own way (instead of being dependent on the whims and wishes of private employers).

In other words, it’s the same argument conservatives make: everyone wants (and at least should want) to be a worker. Except, of course, for those at the very top, who are dependent on getting a cut of what workers produce.

Comments
  1. […] By David F. Ruccio […]

  2. […] have already dealt numerous times (e.g, here, here, and here) with the argument that participating in wage-labor is intrinsically dignified. But […]

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