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One of the consequences of Bernie Sanders’s campaign for president is that economists and economic ideas that are often overlooked or marginalized are making the news.

Consider, for example, Gerald Friedman [ht: ja], a University of Massachusetts Amherst economics professor.* He’s front-page news on CNN, and that’s because he has provided “the first comprehensive look at the impact of all of Sanders’ spending and tax proposals”—including spending on infrastructure and youth employment, increasing Social Security benefits, making college free, expanding health care and family leave, raising the minimum wage, and shifting income from the rich to the working-class through tax hikes on the wealthy and corporations.

“Like the New Deal of the 1930s, Senator Sanders’ program is designed to do more than merely increase economic activity,” Friedman writes. It will “promote a more just prosperity, broadly-based with a narrowing of economy inequality.”

Emmanuel Saez, Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, is also in the news, because of his research on tax rates. In a 2011 paper he wrote with Peter Diamond, Saez argued that, in order to achieve a fair distribution of the tax burden in the midst of rising inequality, very high earners should be subject to high and rising marginal tax rates on earnings. While the top income marginal tax rate on earnings today is about 42.5 percent, they estimate the optimal top tax rate (which would maximize tax revenue from top-bracket taxpayers) to be 73 percent, even higher than Sanders is currently proposing.

“My feel is that the reasoning behind Sanders’s tax plan is not so much tax revenue generation from top earners but rather make top tax rates so high so as to discourage ‘greed,’ defined broadly as extracting income at the expense of the rest of the economy as opposed to real productive behavior,” Mr. Saez wrote in an email. “I think pretax top incomes would finally start to decline.”

Friedman and Saez are economists who are never cited in the mainstream media. But their ideas are now receiving a public airing precisely because of Sanders’s extraordinary success in the current campaign.

 

*Here’s the appropriate disclaimer: I did my doctoral work at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, although Friedman was not there at the time. However, we have traded course syllabi and discussed how best to teach the first Great Depression.

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