Inequality and trust in experts

Posted: 7 July 2016 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , ,

wind-blows-dylan-1

Chris Dillow’s latest post reminds me of a point I overlooked in my own post yesterday on the public’s declining trust in the expertise of mainstream economists: the effects of inequality.

The argument I made was that, because mainstream economists relegate issues like power and class to the margins, they literally don’t see (for themselves) or show (to others) the unequal distributions that are either presumed by capitalism or that follow from capitalist ways of organizing economic and social life. Therefore, many members of the public who are affected by and/or concerned with such issues have become more likely to ignore and even challenge the self-professed expertise of mainstream economists.

What Dillow adds to this is the idea that trust itself has declined with growing inequality (which, as it turns out, I wrote about back in 2014).

As a way of expanding my original argument, we may be witnessing a self-reinforcing vicious cycle: the policies promoted by mainstream economists have led to increasing inequality, which mainstream economists tend to overlook or ignore. That growing inequality has, in turn, decreased the level of trust in the wider society, including trust in so-called experts. Together, the falling level of trust and the fact that mainstream economists literally don’t see or show the distributional consequences of the policies they support have propelled the larger public to question the presumed expertise of mainstream economists.

And rightly so. As Bob Dylan once sang, “You don’t need a weather man/To know which way the wind blows.”

Comments
  1. […] buying what mainstream economists are selling. They are (as I’ve argued here, here, and here) ignoring the so-called […]

  2. […] Kingdom—aren’t buying what mainstream economists are selling. They are (as I’ve argued here, here, and here) ignoring the so-called […]

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