Chart of the day

Posted: 11 July 2016 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , ,

Top1-composition

Here’s another of my charts—this one for the composition of income of the top 1 percent—from the latest data on inequality in the United States created and disseminated by Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty.

This chart shows the sources of the income going to the top 1 percent—basically, the various ways the members of the top 1 percent are able to capture a share of the economy-wide surplus: in the form of wages (defined as wages and salaries and pensions), profits (profits from S-Corporations, Partnerships, and sole proprietorship businesses plus farm income), dividends, interest, and rents.

So, for example, in 2015, the top 1 percent received their portion of the surplus as wages (53.7 percent), profits (32.3 percent), dividends (8.6 percent), interest (3.2 percent), and rents (2.2 percent).*

I’ve included the actual data below.

The previous charts are here and here. As always, readers should feel free to use this chart and reproduce it as they wish.

Wages Profits Dividends Interest Rents
1979 59.0 17.0 12.5 8.0 3.5
1980 60.5 13.3 12.5 10.0 3.6
1981 62.7 7.8 12.4 13.3 3.7
1982 62.6 8.2 12.3 12.9 3.9
1983 65.5 9.8 11.0 10.7 3.0
1984 66.1 9.9 8.9 12.4 2.7
1985 63.6 11.0 9.6 12.3 3.4
1986 65.7 11.1 10.8 10.6 1.7
1987 63.9 17.2 7.2 10.4 1.4
1988 59.8 21.2 7.6 10.0 1.5
1989 56.7 22.3 7.4 11.8 1.8
1990 57.9 22.3 6.8 11.1 2.0
1991 57.4 23.0 6.6 11.0 2.1
1992 61.6 23.6 5.4 7.1 2.3
1993 62.1 23.8 5.3 6.2 2.6
1994 59.1 26.8 5.3 6.1 2.7
1995 59.2 27.3 5.1 5.9 2.4
1996 59.7 27.0 5.2 5.7 2.4
1997 60.3 26.7 5.1 5.4 2.5
1998 61.1 26.6 4.7 5.2 2.4
1999 62.1 26.1 4.7 4.8 2.3
2000 63.0 24.7 5.0 5.1 2.2
2001 61.7 26.5 4.2 5.1 2.5
2002 61.2 27.4 4.2 4.6 2.7
2003 60.2 27.7 5.2 4.2 2.8
2004 58.4 28.4 6.5 4.1 2.6
2005 54.8 30.9 6.6 5.2 2.6
2006 53.5 30.1 7.4 6.7 2.4
2007 54.3 27.7 8.4 7.5 2.3
2008 55.7 28.3 7.5 5.6 2.9
2009 56.4 30.7 6.0 4.4 2.6
2010 57.2 29.2 7.0 4.0 2.6
2011 58.4 29.0 6.4 3.5 2.7
2012 54.9 30.0 9.2 3.2 2.8
2013 56.7 30.6 6.7 3.1 3.0
2014 55.1 31.2 7.7 2.8 3.3
2015 53.7 32.3 8.6 3.2 2.2

 

*These are the wages that distort the usual calculations of the profit-wage ratio (as I explained here and here). To obtain a more accurate sense of capital and labor shares, the wages of the 1 percent should be subtracted from the labor share and added to the capital share.

Comments
  1. […] charts in this series can be found here, here, here, and […]

  2. […] Other charts in this series can be found here, here, and here. […]

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