A roof over their heads?

Posted: 12 June 2017 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , ,

OOR_2017_Min-Wage-Map_County-Metro

A minimum-wage job should be enough to satisfy workers’ minimum needs, which of course includes putting a roof over their heads.

In reality, it doesn’t. A person working a full-time minimum-wage job will find it virtually impossible to rent an affordable home anywhere in the United States, according to a new study by the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

The report reveals that in fact there is not a single county or metropolitan area in which a minimum-wage worker can afford a two-bedroom home, which the federal government defines as paying less than 30 percent of a household’s income for rent and utilities. And in only 12 counties in the entire country is a one-bedroom rental home affordable.

OOR_2017_Min-Wage-Map

On average, a full-time worker in the United States must earn $21.21 per hour to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment and $17.14 to afford a one-bedroom apartment—figures that roughly correspond to the mean and median hourly wages in the country. As for everyone who earns less than that—the millions of low-wage workers, seniors and people with disabilities living on fixed incomes, and other low-income households—housing costs are simply “out of reach.”

Another way of seeing the problem is to calculate how many hours a minimum-wage employee would have to work to afford a one-bedroom rental home. Even Puerto Rico, which would require the fewest number of hours (45), exceeds the normal 40-hour workweek. At the other end, a minimum-wage worker in New Jersey would have toil more than two and a half times the normal week (106 hours) to afford a one-bedroom rental home.

It’s clear that private markets—in labor and housing—have failed American workers. They can provide neither decent-paying jobs nor the affordable housing for millions of members of the U.S. working-class to put a roof over their heads.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s