Socialized inequality

Posted: 13 June 2017 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , ,

Ex5

For over a century, the most effective way to stop attempts to reduce healthcare disparities in the United States has been to invoke the fear of “socialized medicine.” As a result, Americans have ended up with socialized inequality in their healthcare system.

And they know it.

According to a new study by Joachim O. Hero, Alan M. Zaslavsky, and Robert J. Blendon published in Health Affairs (unfortunately behind a paywall), 67 percent of respondents in the health module of the General Social Survey believed that “many” people in the United States do not have access to the health care they need. This is over 10 percentage points higher than the level in any other country, and over twice the median country rate of 31 percent. And even though only 54 percent of respondents viewed income-based differences in the quality of health care that people have access to as unfair (much lower than the median country rate of 68 percent), the majority of respondents—54 percent of those who viewed income-related disparities as fair and 73 percent of the respondents who viewed such disparities as unfair expressed their support for major health system reform.

Ex1

And reform is, of course, necessary.

The United States has the third-highest disparity—behind only Chile and Portugal—at 25.9 percentage points.* Among US respondents, 38.2 percent in the bottom income tertile reported fair or poor health, compared to 21.4 percent in the middle tertile, and 12.3 percent in the top tertile.

While many countries exhibited consistent disparities in health care across measures of access and care satisfaction, most had mixed or negligible disparities in all measures. The United States stands out by exhibiting large disparities in most measures, making it unique among high-income countries. In fact, the United States had the second-largest disparity in people forgoing needed medical treatment because they could not pay for it, at 16.5 percentage points (behind only the Philippines), and the third-highest disparity in people believing they would get the best treatment available in their country if they were seriously ill, at 15.5 percentage points (behind only Chile and Bulgaria).

We often forget that the Affordable Care Act, in addition to extending health insurance, bolstered efforts to address socialized inequality in a number of other ways, including improved standards for data collection, support for disparities research, provisions to support diversity in the health care workforce, and the funding of demonstration programs aimed at reducing health disparities.

According to the authors of the study,

Eliminating these efforts without providing clear alternatives would risk taking a step backward in an area where the United States is in sore need of improvement, and in a political environment where solutions with broad support are increasingly hard to find.

 

*Disparity is defined by the authors as the percentage-point difference between respondents in the top and bottom income tertiles.

Comments
  1. Americans: Having more money buys you a better house, a better wife, better prospects and a better social circle for your kids, and overall better chances of survival for you and your offspring.

    Europeans: Everyone belongs to the same society, everyone is safe, and everyone’s kids have similar prospects. Extra money buys you some finer things, if you care for them, or more leisure later in life.

    Survivalist healthcare is consistent with the American nightmare. Which of these attitudes to life do American people truly want?

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