Search Results

Themes of 2016

Posted: 6 January 2017 in Uncategorized

Looking back over the past year, here are the ten major themes I found in my blog posts: inequality critique of mainstream economics the U.S. presidential election, especially Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump class and surplus epistemology, especially uncertainty utopia working-class corporations and capital academy critique of liberalism We’ll see what happens in the current year. . […]

  Are mainstream economists responsible for electing Donald Trump? I think they deserve a significant share of the blame. So, as it turns out, does Dani Rodrick. My argument is that, when mainstream economists in the United States embraced and celebrated neoliberalism—both the conservative and liberal versions—they participated in creating the conditions for Trump’s victory in the […]

Here’s the link to Adam Morton’s generous—and, in my view, perceptive—review of my book, Development and Globalization: A Marxian Class Analysis. The main point I want to articulate is that the book is indispensable reading for class in the twofold sense that this phrase can be read. First, as indispensable reading for class in that key chapters in […]

Dan Rodrick, like most mainstream economists, wouldn’t know left-wing economics if it bit him on the proverbial nose (as I explained in early 2015). What he’s really referring to—in his essay, “The Abdication of the Left”—is liberal economics, the left-of-center wing of mainstream economics. But, if you replace all his references to “the Left” with “liberalism,” you can read Rodrick’s latest column […]

Regular readers of this blog know that I take seriously the idea that representations of the economy are regularly produced and disseminated in many different forms and social sites. They are generated, of course, within the discipline of economics as well as by official (degreed) economists in think tanks, financial institutions, the media, and elsewhere. But, I argue, […]

Class and air rage

Posted: 6 May 2016 in Uncategorized
Tags: , ,

I just finished booking a couple of flights and, I’ll admit, I felt a bit of rage—at the exorbitant prices (notwithstanding low oil costs, because of increasing concentration in the industry) and the additional charges (as airlines find new ways of nickel-and-diming us to achieve even higher profits). Apparently, I might feel even more rage when I […]

In Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities, Craig Steven Wilder laid bare the uncomfortable truths about race, slavery, and the American academy. What he showed is that the founding of many of America’s revered colleges and universities―from Harvard, Yale, and Princeton to Rutgers, Williams College, and the University of North Carolina―came soaked in […]

Consider the irony: Bernie Sanders was seated alongside Bolivian President Evo Morales as he participated in a conference on social, economic, and environmental issues hosted by the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences. Meanwhile, in news reports concerning Sanders’s visit to the Vatican, I learned that Jeffrey Sachs is one of the democratic socialists’s foreign policy advisers. […]

The “drown the bunnies” scandal at Mount St. Mary’s University has opened a debate about the growing role of college and university presidents who come from outside the academy, especially the business world.* The problem is, only one participant in the debate, Shelly Weiss Storbeck, even raised the issue of governance. As I see it, the […]

I often tell students that, if they don’t change their major five times before they settle on one, they’re not really taking advantage of what college has to offer. They need to try out different ideas and areas and see where it takes them. It’s my attempt to push back against pressure from many sources for students to […]