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Class issues became central to the 2016 presidential campaign in ways that I can’t recall for any other election in my lifetime. And even now, during the post-election debate, the references to class remain widespread. It’s not that the discussion of class in relation to the election has been particularly interesting or revealing. Americans, especially political pundits, still […]

Themes of 2016

Posted: 6 January 2017 in Uncategorized

Looking back over the past year, here are the ten major themes I found in my blog posts: inequality critique of mainstream economics the U.S. presidential election, especially Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump class and surplus epistemology, especially uncertainty utopia working-class corporations and capital academy critique of liberalism We’ll see what happens in the current year. . […]

RIP in 2016

Posted: 5 January 2017 in Uncategorized
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“Don’t waste any time mourning. Organize!” was Joe Hill’s advice to “Big Bill” Haywood in one of the last telegrams he sent before being executed in 1915. But that doesn’t mean we should fail to mark notable deaths in 2016. Here are some of the ones I noted on the blog: Paul Kantner Jazz Record Mart Gato […]

Cartoons of 2016

Posted: 5 January 2017 in Uncategorized
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From what I hear, many regular readers have come to expect their cartoon(s) of the day. The amazing thing is, I never run out (although, truth be told, I sometimes have to work a bit harder to find cartoons that have not already appeared on this blog). That’s because there are many amazing cartoonists out there, […]

Neil Irwin is right: “Poor and working-class Americans have fallen behind over the last generation, receiving few of the gains of an expanding economy.” So, he wants to devise a tax plan to change that. The problem is, Irwin only looks at raising the income of the bottom 20 percent of families to where they […]

Class and Trumponomics

Posted: 6 December 2016 in Uncategorized

President-elect Donald Trump has inherited an economy that is as divided as the electorate. The question is, what will that economy look like if and when Trump’s right-wing national-populist promises and post-election proposals are enacted? As I have shown in the three installments of the first part of this series, “Class Before Trumponomics” (here, here, and here), […]

In the second installment of this series on “class before Trumponomics,” I argued that, in recent decades, while American workers have created enormous wealth, most of the increase in that wealth has been captured by their employers and a tiny group at the top—as workers have been forced to compete with one another for new kinds of jobs, with fewer protections, […]

In the first installment of this series on “class before Trumponomics,” I argued that the recovery from the crash of 2007-08 created conditions that were favorable to capital at the expense of labor—and that trend represented a continuation of the class dynamic that had characterized the U.S. economy for decades, going back at least to […]

The working-class—at least the white working-class—has become the main theme of the post-election narrative in the United States. That’s not surprising since, as Jim Tankersley explained: Whites without a college degree — men and women — made up a third of the 2016 electorate. Trump won them by 39 percentage points, according to exit polls, far […]

  Right now, after Donald’s Trump surprising victory and in the midst of the messy transition, everyone is curious about how the U.S. economy will change if and when the president-elect’s economic policies are enacted.* But first things first. We need to have a clear understanding of what the U.S. economy looks like now, during the uneven […]