Posts Tagged ‘Apple’

2019 was a very good year for the world’s wealthiest individuals. The normal workings of global capitalism created both more billionaires and more combined wealth owned by those billionaires.

According to Wealth-X, which claims to “have developed the world’s most extensive collection of records on wealthy individuals and produce unparalleled data analysis to help our clients uncover, understand, and engage their target audience,  as well as mitigate risk,” the size of the global billionaire population increased strongly in 2019, rising by 8.5 percent
to 2,825 individuals, while their combined wealth increased by 10.3 percent to $9.4 trillion.

To put that into perspective, the world’s real Gross Domestic Product grew by only 2.9 percent (International Monetary Fund) in 2019—while the value of global equities, which is key to billionaires’ wealth, soared by more than 25 percent (MSCI World Index).

The United States still leads the list of the world’s billionaire population and their wealth. In 2019, the number of American billionaires rose by almost 12 percent to 788 individuals, accounting for 28 percent of the global billionaire population (China has the next highest share at 12 percent). Cumulative billionaire wealth in the United States increased by 14 percent to $3.4 trillion, more than the combined net worth of the next eight highest-ranked countries and equivalent to a 36 percent share of global billionaire wealth.*

What about the novel coronavirus pandemic?

According to Bloomberg, only two of the world’s 10 richest people have seen their wealth decline in 2020: luxury mogul Bernard Arnault and Berkshire Hathaway Inc.’s Warren Buffett. Everyone else, whose wealth is tied to technology holdings (except for Mukesh Ambani, the Indian billionaire who chairs and runs oil and gas giant Reliance Industries), has seen their individual and collective wealth increase—none more so than Jeff Bezos (the Amazon.com Inc. founder who has seen his net worth soar by $63.6 billion this year) and Elon Musk (whose net worth has more than doubled to $69.7 billion on the back of surging Tesla Inc shares).**

On a global level, billionaires tied to technology businesses have outperformed all others, especially those whose wealth is tied to the automotive, shipping, media, textiles and apparel, and aerospace (less so defense) industries. They, of course, are the ones who most want to see a quick solution to the pandemic and a reopening of economic activity around the world.

In general terms, wealthier billionaires are more exposed to the ebbs and flows of the stock market, while those at lower tiers tend to have more of their wealth in private holdings, likely to be their primary business. For example, those in the two highest billionaire wealth tiers—above $10 billion— hold between almost half and more than three-quarters of their assets in public holdings. These individuals have withstood significant volatility in their wealth as stock markets first fell considerably and then rebounded equally dramatically—this past Friday, to a new record high in the United States—since the beginning of the pandemic.

So, what are the world’s billionaires, in the United States and around the globe, doing with their wealth in the midst of the pandemic? We know they’re not particularly worried with the same problems as their predecessors, the Robber Barons, whose enormous economic power in the United States created a fierce counter-reaction, in militant labor unrest and the adoption of reforms that once seemed radical, like the Sherman Antitrust Act and a federal income tax.

At least so far. . .

Instead, according to Wealth-X, they are

working with their wealth advisors and planners to ensure their financial holdings and wealth plans (whether concerned with investment diversification, wealth transfer or philanthropic aims) remain up to date and in the best possible state given the evolving global situation.

They’re also concerned about their own safety and new forms of luxury consumption. According to the Wealth-X Global Luxury Outlook 2020. “The wealthy’s mindset around what luxury is has changed—their priorities have shifted towards their families,” Jaclyn Sienna India, CEO of luxury travel company Sienna Charles, said in the report. “Luxury now includes a second passport, access to healthcare and the freedom to go when and where they feel safe and secure.”

“Quite a few wealthy people are looking for exclusive safe havens in the form of second homes—safety has become a priority for them,” Alistair Brown, CEO of Alistair Brown International Real Estate. “But with this purchase, they expect access to established locations often via residency and additional passports as well as access to medical help.”

Additionally, the wealthy have become increasingly accustomed to purchasing luxury goods online since the pandemic, as high-end brands expand their digital offerings, the report said.

“The wealthy continue to value luxury as they did prior to Covid-19. However, the way they buy luxury has changed, with more having moved to making their purchases online,” Winston Chesterfield, principal of luxury watch company Barton.

Meanwhile, what is everyone else supposed to do? Well, they have to stay as safe as they can at home and on the job—as they are subjected to the second or third wave of the pandemic—and try to obtain sufficient food, remain in their shelter while not being able to keep up with their rents and mortgages, and pay for their healthcare—in the midst of widespread pay cuts and soaring unemployment.

And, perhaps, begin to sharpen the twenty-first century equivalent of pitchforks. . .

———

*That’s my quick (and, I understand, overly simplistic) argument against the rise of fascism in the United States: billionaires and the other members of the group of ultra-wealthy individuals don’t need it, since they’re doing quite well the way things are.

**Currently, five of the largest American tech companies—Apple, Amazon, Alphabet, Facebook, and Microsoft—have market valuations equivalent to about 30 percent of U.S. gross domestic product. That’s almost double what they were at the end of 2018.

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Although, I understand, it’s actually produced elsewhere: it’s assembled in China and the parts are manufactured in many other countries. . .

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Richard Maxwell and Toby Miller recently made the case for solidarity-based consumerism in response to Apple’s business model:

Faced with a global political economy that condones such a business model, proponents of solidarity between electronics workers and digital consumers(link is external) have big ambitions. They aim to eliminate the estrangement between worker and consumer, awaken consciousness of the political and economic ties that bind them, and install resolute ethical commitments to building a new kind of bond based in mutuality, justice, and equality that stretches across the global supply chain of electronic goods.

As consumers, we should support a solidarity-based consumerism. The alternative is the status quo where profits are beat out of the lives of electronics workers while consumers pay a premium to keep the mark-ups feeding those profits. To the egoistic consumer, we say it’s time to stop blaming higher wages for higher prices. Instead, ask Apple, the most valuable company in the world, to lower its prices and pay good wages directly to factory workers who make their i-Things. Trust us, they won’t go broke.

They base their argument on an analysis of the financial relationships between Electronic Manufacturing Services (providers such as Flextronics, Foxconn, and Jabil) and the Brand Names (like Apple) of consumer electronics by industry veteran Anthony Harris (pdf).

Harris’s example clearly shows how the wages of workers who actually produce smart phones and other electronic gadgets are a small (he estimates them to be 2 percent) of the final price of those commodities.

All along the product supply chain – from the component supplier to the assembly factory to the retail outlet – prices are factored up by percentage of goods value. The factory price is marked-up on basis of invoice value without differentiating between cost of labour, manufacturing complexity, materials, IP, or other value. The EMS selling price gets a margin added every time it is moving down the chain. For example, a smartphone with a factory price of 100 Euro of which 2 Euro = labour costs. Next in line exports to USA/Europe and adds 30% (logistics, management, margin) = 130 Euro. Distributor in USA adds another 30% for logistics, risk and labour = 169 Euro. The store adds its percentage and then there is the internet provider contract and Vat, all pushing upwards to 500 Euro. With this standard business model mark-up on the EMS selling price the actual labour cost becomes almost insignificant as an element of the retail store price.

He also explains the high cost to workers of “flexibility” at the bottom of the chain:

To illustrate what happens: When Apple launched the initial manufacturing of the iPhone, a screen change was suddenly required. 8,000 workers were woken from their dormitories in the middle of the night in China. Within 30 minutes, after being given tea and biscuits, they began an unscheduled 12-hour shift to kick-start the change for the new screens. Foxconn relentlessly ramped up production to 10,000 pieces (a day) after only four days. One Apple executive, as quoted in The New York Times, said “That speed and flexibility is breath taking. There’s no American plant that can match that.”

Breath taking speed and flexibility, however, come at a human price, which clearly American workers at that time were not prepared to endure. Yet with a cup of tea and a biscuit, impoverished Chinese workers were all too ready to earn some extra money to help cover basic costs and feed their families.

I am interested in Harris’s analysis because, in class the other day, the students wanted to know if the iPhone represented an example of a utility theory of value or a labor theory of value. (We were discussing the different assumptions and consequences of those two theories of value.) And, when I answered that both theories could be used to make sense of the price of an iPhone but the two theories were incompatible, they wanted to know if it was possible to combine them (rather than choose between them).

Let me pose a bit of a different question: which of the two theories is more compatible with the kind of solidarity-based consumerism Maxwell and Miller are advocating?

According to the utility (or neoclassical) theory of value, the final price of an iPhone represents a balance between supply and demand and, as such, reflects the preferences, technology, and resource endowments of the societies at each stage of the supply chain. In particular, the workers in the Electronic Manufacturing Services, who receive low wages and agree to flexible rules, are being paid according to their productivity and desire to work. No more, no less. Therefore, consumers can remain content to purchase their iPhones at the going price and, if by chance they become aware of what’s going at the bottom, let “the market” work things out. No need to worry.

According to a labor theory of value (in particular, a Marxian labor theory of value), the final price of an iPhone represents something else: it’s a combination of the materials and equipment purchased to produce and transport iPhones, the wages paid to workers at various stages of the supply chain, and a surplus created by those workers. That surplus is in turn used for various purposes: taxes to governments, salaries of executives, dividends to shareholders, and, perhaps most important, an extensive advertising campaign to make sure millions of people continue to want to purchase more iPhones. And the less workers are paid on the bottom and at each stage of the supply chain, and the more “flexible” are their work rules, the more surplus Apple is able to appropriate and the higher price at which they can sell their smart phones.

Clearly, a labor theory of value is more compatible with Maxwell and Miller’s solidarity-based consumerism. It makes people aware of the work and value-creation that are taking place at each stage of the supply chain—from the initial research and development through the production of the phones to their transportation to wherever they are sold—and the amount of surplus Apple is able to capture for its own purposes.

In the end, those are the high costs that serve as the basis of the high price of our iPhones.

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