Posts Tagged ‘blogging’

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The so-called recovery from capitalism’s latest crises has been going on now for a decade. During that time, we’ve been witnessing—and attempting to survive and, at the same time, imagine and enact a future beyond—the devastating conditions and consequences of what I came to call the Second Great Depression.

As it turns out, that’s the same time frame for this blog. I started it back in 2009, after I stepped down as editor of the journal Rethinking Marxism, and have been publishing it ever since. The initial idea was to post “occasional” links and commentary but, as regular readers know, it became much more than that. Thousands of shorter and longer posts, especially on inequality and class; critical engagements with contemporary debates on economics, culture, and society; a few guest posts; original data and charts; and, of course, daily cartoons.

Thanks to the number-crunching algorithms of WordPress, this is what the past decade looks like:

    • more than 9000 total posts
    • 1.6 million total words published
    • 1.2 million views from readers
    • visitors from 219 different countries and territories

Plus more than 4000 posts on my Twitter feed.

As I see it, the large number of views seems to indicate that there are many people out there—students, professors, activists, and others—who are dissatisfied with business as usual, both with the uneven recovery from the latest crises of capitalism and with the blithe assertions by economic and political elites (and those who represent their interests in the academy and media) that there are no alternatives.

Once again, I want to thank the folks at the Real-World Economics Review BlogProgress in Political Economy, and Democracy at Work for reposting some of the items that originally appeared here, thus expanding the discussion and debate.

I especially want to acknowledge the many readers—Wordpress and email followers (more than 1500 of you), as well as regular and infrequent visitors—who, my hope is, have found the occasional useful insights in what I link to and comment on. . .

Posts of the year II

Posted: 5 January 2018 in Uncategorized
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As I explained yesterday, some of my own favorite posts do not appear on the list of the ones that received the most views last year.

Here is a selection from the second half of 2017:

Economics as religion?

Dictatorship and stolen time

Culture beyond capitalism

“We’ve got the robots”

From oligarchs to Soviets—and back again

Time to dethrone economists

Economics in Wonderland

Economics and the new history of capitalism

What are economists good for?

Inequality and immiseration

Socialism today

Laughter is the best medicine

The gilded age: a tale of today

Haunted by surplus

Global rentier capitalism

Liberal Superman theory

Conspicuous tax evasion

Desperately seeking a link between wages and productivity

At the bottom of the wealth pyramid

The arc of (pre)history bends towards greater inequality

Accumulate, accumulate! That is Moses and the prophets!

J. D. Vance, neoliberalism, and Trumpalachia

The goose and the commons

Capitalism and punishment

Posts of the year I

Posted: 4 January 2018 in Uncategorized
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René Magritte, “Forbidden Literature (The Use of the Word)” (1936)

Some of the posts I most enjoyed writing do not appear on the list of the ones that received the most views last year.

Here is a sample of my favorites from the first half of 2017:

Indignity of not-work?

Makers vs. takers?

College and the American Dream

Economism—or vulgar economics

Beyond Trump and free trade

Lies, damn lies, and statistics

Robots don’t kill workers, do they?

What about that pie?

Economists as plumbers?

Make GDP great again

“In this interregnum morbid phenomena of the most varied kind come to pass”

Populism and mainstream economics

Look, Ma, no competition

Changing the story to hide the problem

Tale of two depressions

Dual economies and the vanishing middle-class

Original sin?

America’s killing fields

Essays in persuasion

Unsettling the binaries—of economics and war

Left behind

Income and wealth—the top and the very top

Conspicuous productivity

“Forward without forgetting”

End of Second Great Depression

Platform capitalism?

Hiding the surplus

The internet of things appears, at first sight, a very trivial thing, and easily understood

American myth

Bread and roses

What do unions do?

This is the end—or is it?

Rocking the boat

Technology, employment, and distribution

Inequality and climate change

Year in review

Posted: 1 January 2018 in Uncategorized
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It’s the start of a new year, and thus the appropriate time to look back on the old one.

Over the course of 2017, I cut back on the number of posts (to a total of about 600), partly because I decided not to post on weekends (other than cartoons) and partly because I shifted some of what had been shorter posts in the past to my Twitter feed.*

Still, the posts on the blog received about 100 thousand views—half from the United States and the other half from 180 or so different countries and territories around the world—during 2017.

As I noted at the time, the blog reached one million total views in March. And, according to my rough calculations, I have written something on the order of two million words in more than five thousand posts since I started the blog in 2009.

Here are the individual posts (most from 2017, some from previous years) that received the most views last year:

The unholy alliance of Trump voters

Radicals versus liberals

Hillbilly Elegy

Capital (gains) vs. labor (income)

Poverty of redistribution liberalism

Neoclassical economists and the minimum wage

Nobel economics: the behaviorism of economic decisions and its secret

Capitalocene

Trickledown economics—then and now

Narrative economics

Class, in a nutshell

The top and the very top

Why human capital is not capital

“Labour is a disgrace”

Globalization—how did they get it so wrong?

Late capitalism?

White trash

I want to thank the folks at the Real-World Economics Review BlogProgress in Political Economy, and Democracy at Work for reposting some of the items that originally appeared here, thus expanding the conversation.

I especially want to thank the many readers—Wordpress and email followers (more than a thousand of you), as well as regular and infrequent visitors—who, my hope is, find the occasional useful insights in what I link to and comment on. . .

 

*My plan is to cut back the number of posts even further in 2018, in order to have more time to work on my current book, “Utopia and Critique.”

1,000,000!

Posted: 30 March 2017 in Uncategorized
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Apparently, there are lots of folks out there who also, every morning, wake up on the wrong side of capitalism.

That’s the only explanation I have for the fact that, as of yesterday, this blog reached an extraordinary milestone: it has received more than one million views.

I really don’t know what else to make of the number. I started this blog (at the suggestion of a couple of former students) back in 2009. I still call it “occasional” but, as regular readers know, it’s anything but. But I don’t have a particularly good handle on why so many people from so many “countries” (212, both official countries and territories, according to WordPress) have found their way to this blog.

I do get the occasional message from readers about how they or someone they’ve met find the information and analysis useful. That couldn’t please me more—to know that what I write here travels and serves a wide variety of people who are attempting, as that hoary German philosopher once wrote, to both interpret and change the world.

So, yes, the large number of views does seem to indicate that there are many people out there—students, professors, activists, and others—who are dissatisfied with business as usual, both with the uneven recovery from the latest crises of capitalism and with the blithe assertions by economic and political elites (and those who represent their interests in the academy and media) that there are no alternatives.

We, on the other hand, are guided by the idea that something is seriously wrong with contemporary economic and social institutions—and other worlds are indeed possible.

The readership as it turns out is even wider, as many of the posts that originally appear here are reposted on the Real-World Economics Review blogDemocracy at Work, Progress in Political Economy, and perhaps elsewhere. I want to thank all of them for their continued encouragement and support.

In all honesty, the major satisfaction I derive from this blog stems from the new kinds of research and writing it has allowed me to do—mostly concerning on-going events and commentary by others about what is going on in the world, especially (but not only) with respect to the economy and contemporary economists. My goal throughout has been to carry out (or at least point toward) a “ruthless criticism of everything existing,” a project to which many others around the world are also currently contributing.

For my part, I can’t say I’ve settled on the best way to conduct that critique and present it to readers. That’s why I’m always open to feedback and suggestions—about both topics and ways I can make this work more useful.

What I can say is I derive a great of pleasure from working on a daily basis on this blog (even if there were no readers)—and even more from the fact that so many people in the United States and around the world find it worthwhile to find the time to visit the blog and read what I write.

Perhaps someday we’ll all wake up from this nightmare, on the right side of capitalism—as it becomes a distant memory.

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For some reason, WordPress didn’t crunch the numbers this year. So, just out of curiosity, I did.

As it turns out, this blog was viewed 110,887 times last year—by visitors from 184 different countries, with the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, and Australia leading the list.

I wrote 860 new posts in 2016 (495 without the daily cartoons), growing the total archive of this blog to 7,571 posts.

As regular readers know, most of what I write on this blog are responses to ideas and items that appear in the daily media. However, as promised, I did work on a few longer series last year—on the numbers concerning inequality in the United States (in four parts: here, here, here, and here), the political economy of the U.S. healthcare system (in seven parts: here, here, here, here, here, here, and here), and the class dimensions of Trumponomics (in four parts: here, here, here, and here).

According to the numbers, most visitors tend to go to the home page. Here are the individual posts (some from 2016, others from previous years) that received the most views last year:

Hillbilly Elegy

Does Wall Street do anything useful?

Capital (gains) vs. labor (income)

Socialism is obvious

Radicals versus liberals

“The university system has gone the way of Walmart”

Only in America

Neoclassical economists and the minimum wage

Mapping the emerging post-capitalist paradigm and its main thinkers

Neoliberalism—ideas AND political project

I finally decided to inaugurate a Twitter account, which includes items posted on the blog as well as many other things.

I want to thank the folks at the Real-World Economics Review Blog, Progress in Political Economy, and Democracy at Work for reposting some of the items that originally appeared here, thus expanding the conversation.

I especially want to thank the readers—Wordpress and email followers, as well as regular and infrequent visitors—who, my hope is, find the occasional useful bits in what I link to and comment on. . .

Upgrading

Posted: 29 April 2016 in Uncategorized
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Upgrade

It’s time, I suppose, to upgrade this blog—from WordPress’s free version to the premium version (which I’m going to have to pay for).

The only reason I’m doing this is because I’ve run out of storage space. The premium version offers more space to store all the images, charts, and so on I publish with each and every post. (The alternative would be to eliminate the image files, which I’m unwilling to do.) It also allows me to upload videos.

For readers, the only real change you’ll see is the ads that often accompany posts will disappear (not that I ever got a dime for them—it all went to WordPress).

Now, I’m just hoping the transition goes smoothly and I don’t lose any of the existing content. . .

7000 and counting

Posted: 27 April 2016 in Uncategorized
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I just noticed that, according to WordPress (which keeps track of such things), I’ve published 7000 posts since I began this blog in mid-2009.

Hmmm. . .

Map of the day

Posted: 31 December 2013 in Uncategorized
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According to the number-crunching program at WordPress.com, this blog attracted about 150,000 views from 193 countries during 2013.

5000 and counting

Posted: 20 December 2013 in Uncategorized
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Oops, almost missed that one. . .

According to the numbers WordPress continues to send my way, this is blog post number 5002.

I want to thank all the readers, including those who have sent in their comments and suggestions, since I started this blog in the summer of 2009. I also what to thank the folks at the Real World Economics Review blog for reposting material from this site.

In the new year, I am hoping to include more guest posts and at least one longer piece each week. If, that is, I have the time. . .