Posts Tagged ‘CEOs’

sorensen

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Chart of the day

Posted: 8 June 2015 in Uncategorized
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The Chronicle of Higher Education has updated its executive-compensation package information with 2014 fiscal-year data on public-college presidents.

Two public-college presidents managed total annual compensation packages of over $1 million: Rodney A. Erickson of Penn State ($1,494,603) and R. Bowen Loftin of Texas A&M ($1,128,957). The median salary for presidents who served a full year was $428,250.

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The median presidential pay for public colleges in 2014 was 50 times the median student tuition. Two presidents managed total compensation more than 100 times student tuition: Judy L. Genshaft of the University of South Florida (112.27) and John C. Hitt of the University of Central Florida (100.03).

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www.usnews 

Is Dan Price [ht:sm], the founder and CEO of Gravity Payments who raised the salaries of his employees and slashed his own pay, a socialist hero?

Well, no. Not really. Price certainly doesn’t think so. And, in the end, he—not Gravity’s employees as a group—is the one who decided what the new pay scheme would look like. He is the one who took the decision to distribute some of the surplus produced by his workers back to them in the form of higher wages and to take a smaller amount of that surplus in his compensation.

But I do like the fact that the two KTVB interviewers, Dee Sarton and Carolyn Holly, are clearly taken with Dan Price and his decision—which presumably stand in sharp contrast to all the other CEOs they’ve been forced to interview over the years.

Even more, Price’s decision proves once again (as I argued back in 2013) that “capitalists do lots of different things.”

They do make profits (at least sometimes, but over what timeframe are they supposedly maximizing those profits?). But they don’t follow any single rule. They also seek to grow their enterprises and destroy the competition and maintain good public relations and buy government officials and reward their CEOs and squeeze workers and lower costs and build factories that collapse and. . .well, you get the idea. In other words, they appropriate and distribute surplus-value in all kinds of ways depending on the particular conditions and struggles that take place over the shape and direction of their enterprises.

So, I’m not prepared to celebrate Price as a “good capitalist,” as against all the “bad capitalists” who are choosing to increase the gap between average workers’ pay and the enormous payments to CEOs.

My point is a actually somewhat different: first, that capitalists—whether in Columbus or Seattle—do lots of different things, and presuming they follow a simple rule (whether profit-maximization as in the usual neoclassical story, or the accumulation of capital in many heterodox stories) means missing out on the complex, contradictory dynamics of capitalist enterprises; and second, that other kinds of enterprises (in which workers themselves make the decisions about how the surplus is appropriated and distributed) would do even more, on a wider scale, to transform the dynamics of the distribution of income and wealth in the U.S. economy.

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According to the AFL-CIO Corporate Pay Watch, in the state of Indiana, the 2014 CEO to average worker’s pay ratio was 101:1 (for corporations in the Russell 3000) and 306:1 (for corporations in the S&P 500).

In the nation as a whole, the ratio (for corporations in the S&P 500) was 373:1, which surpassed the ratio for 2013 (331:1)—both of which were much, much higher than the ratio in 1980 (42:1).

The average CEO compensation of Russell 3000 companies in 2014 was $5,504,432. As it turns out, the industry with the highest CEO pay was Tobacco Products ($13,061,671), followed by Railroad Transportation ($12,526,083), Petroleum Refining ($12,502,981), Communications ($10,769,054), and Hotels ($10,058,029).

As for the Security and Commodity Brokers, Dealers, Exchanges, and Services industry (where financial institutions like Goldman Sachs are located), the average CEO pay was “only” $8,102,970—ranging from $105,295 (for Joe Mansueto of Morningstar) to $88,518,411 (for Mario J. Gabelli of Gamco Investors, Inc.).

Clearly, a large portion of the surplus workers create ends up in the pockets (and portfolios) of the CEOs of the nation’s largest corporations.