Posts Tagged ‘Germany’

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As usual, the Wall Street Journal gets only part of the story: German exporters have certainly benefited from the euro.

The relative weakness of the euro versus a hypothetical Deutschmark is an advantage for Germany. In addition to the fiscal orderliness of Germany, the currency union also includes countries like Italy, Spain, France and Greece all of which haven’t been as successful as Germany in recent years.

This weighs on the euro’s strength, which helps German exporters. As is well known, exports are a key driver of Germany’s economy. A stronger currency would almost certainly make life harder for German exporters by making products more expensive on a global market.

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But then they forget the other part of the story: the role of wage repression in helping German exporting enterprises. The decline of real wages for German workers has massively increased German price-competitiveness in comparison to its Eurozone trading partners and has thus boosted exports—including, of course, to Greece.

It’s the combination of domestic wage repression and fixed exchange rates within Europe that have made German exports competitive and led to the spectacular growth of the trade surplus Germany has enjoyed during the past decade and a half.

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The details of the agreement between Greece and its European creditors are now available. And there’s no doubt about it: this (as the top-trending Twitter hash tag puts it) is a coup. Greece has been forced to surrender (or, given the upcoming debate in parliament, to have the freedom to consider surrendering) a large part of its national sovereignty in exchange for a new European Stability Mechanism program bailout.

Alexis Tsipras [ht: sk] may or may not be a hero, “who fought like a lion against unfathomably large interests” and made it possible for Greece “to live to fight another day.” But that’s really beside the point. So, in the end, is Greek sovereignty—and, for that matter, the humiliating terms sponsored by Germany.

Because what we’re really witnessing is a coup in Europe as a whole. Merkel, Tsipras, Schäuble, and the rest are just the dramatis personae of a series of events that have turned the European project against its own people.

The dream, of course, was to expand democracy, eliminate national rivalries, and promote universal prosperity. But now the European project has become a nightmare of enforcing the conditions of creating and capturing profits—of large enterprises and banks—across an entire continent. And anything that gets in the way—whether existing pensions and state-owned enterprises or rehiring doctors, nurses, and cleaning women—will be sacrificed on the altar of those free-flowing profits.

And who are the losers? The hundreds of millions of workers, farmers, students, young people, and children who are being forced to endure extraordinary levels of unemployment, poverty, and economic insecurity in order to promote a post-2008 recovery that is benefiting only a tiny minority across the continent. And that’s just as true in Germany as in Greece, in England as in Spain. Not to the same degree, of course. But the current negotiations over Greek debt—in which all of their leaders and finance ministers have participated and to which they have given their assent—have demonstrated to the working people of Europe that nothing will be allowed to stand in the way of the interests of the free deployment of capital under conditions that are administered by the troika.

And if an entire nation has to be humiliated in order to serve as an example, so be it. . .

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