Posts Tagged ‘miscellaneous’

Posts of the year II

Posted: 5 January 2018 in Uncategorized
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image

As I explained yesterday, some of my own favorite posts do not appear on the list of the ones that received the most views last year.

Here is a selection from the second half of 2017:

Economics as religion?

Dictatorship and stolen time

Culture beyond capitalism

“We’ve got the robots”

From oligarchs to Soviets—and back again

Time to dethrone economists

Economics in Wonderland

Economics and the new history of capitalism

What are economists good for?

Inequality and immiseration

Socialism today

Laughter is the best medicine

The gilded age: a tale of today

Haunted by surplus

Global rentier capitalism

Liberal Superman theory

Conspicuous tax evasion

Desperately seeking a link between wages and productivity

At the bottom of the wealth pyramid

The arc of (pre)history bends towards greater inequality

Accumulate, accumulate! That is Moses and the prophets!

J. D. Vance, neoliberalism, and Trumpalachia

The goose and the commons

Capitalism and punishment

Posts of the year I

Posted: 4 January 2018 in Uncategorized
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forbidden-literature-the-use-of-the-word-1936(1)

René Magritte, “Forbidden Literature (The Use of the Word)” (1936)

Some of the posts I most enjoyed writing do not appear on the list of the ones that received the most views last year.

Here is a sample of my favorites from the first half of 2017:

Indignity of not-work?

Makers vs. takers?

College and the American Dream

Economism—or vulgar economics

Beyond Trump and free trade

Lies, damn lies, and statistics

Robots don’t kill workers, do they?

What about that pie?

Economists as plumbers?

Make GDP great again

“In this interregnum morbid phenomena of the most varied kind come to pass”

Populism and mainstream economics

Look, Ma, no competition

Changing the story to hide the problem

Tale of two depressions

Dual economies and the vanishing middle-class

Original sin?

America’s killing fields

Essays in persuasion

Unsettling the binaries—of economics and war

Left behind

Income and wealth—the top and the very top

Conspicuous productivity

“Forward without forgetting”

End of Second Great Depression

Platform capitalism?

Hiding the surplus

The internet of things appears, at first sight, a very trivial thing, and easily understood

American myth

Bread and roses

What do unions do?

This is the end—or is it?

Rocking the boat

Technology, employment, and distribution

Inequality and climate change

Charts of the year

Posted: 2 January 2018 in Uncategorized
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Tansey-measure

Mark Tansey, “Coastline Measure” (1987)

As regular readers of this blog know, I try to make available and critically interpret descriptive statistics, mostly charts of data—to provide a foundation for a contemporary critique of political economy.

Last year, I spent a good bit of time using publicly available data to make my own graphs and charts, which readers are free to use for their own purposes.

Here are some of those charts (just click on each one to go to the post in which it originally appeared).

labor-share

corp-taxes

estate1

wealth-pyramid-2014

finance-profits-workers

finance-profits-inequality

labor-income1

djia-wages

ceo-worker

broken

productivity

top10

gdp

income  wealth

countries

pie

notwork11

labor-shares

capital-shares

Year in review

Posted: 1 January 2018 in Uncategorized
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Banksy-Eternity1

It’s the start of a new year, and thus the appropriate time to look back on the old one.

Over the course of 2017, I cut back on the number of posts (to a total of about 600), partly because I decided not to post on weekends (other than cartoons) and partly because I shifted some of what had been shorter posts in the past to my Twitter feed.*

Still, the posts on the blog received about 100 thousand views—half from the United States and the other half from 180 or so different countries and territories around the world—during 2017.

As I noted at the time, the blog reached one million total views in March. And, according to my rough calculations, I have written something on the order of two million words in more than five thousand posts since I started the blog in 2009.

Here are the individual posts (most from 2017, some from previous years) that received the most views last year:

The unholy alliance of Trump voters

Radicals versus liberals

Hillbilly Elegy

Capital (gains) vs. labor (income)

Poverty of redistribution liberalism

Neoclassical economists and the minimum wage

Nobel economics: the behaviorism of economic decisions and its secret

Capitalocene

Trickledown economics—then and now

Narrative economics

Class, in a nutshell

The top and the very top

Why human capital is not capital

“Labour is a disgrace”

Globalization—how did they get it so wrong?

Late capitalism?

White trash

I want to thank the folks at the Real-World Economics Review BlogProgress in Political Economy, and Democracy at Work for reposting some of the items that originally appeared here, thus expanding the conversation.

I especially want to thank the many readers—Wordpress and email followers (more than a thousand of you), as well as regular and infrequent visitors—who, my hope is, find the occasional useful insights in what I link to and comment on. . .

 

*My plan is to cut back the number of posts even further in 2018, in order to have more time to work on my current book, “Utopia and Critique.”

Travel days

Posted: 12 December 2017 in Uncategorized
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photomania-e159166347c1f61ac016bff4526e3c54

I’ll be traveling for the next couple of weeks. No posts then until I return. . .

Travel days

Posted: 22 November 2017 in Uncategorized
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turkey-3

I’ll be traveling for the next few days. No posts then until I return. . .

handbook

I just received my copy of the Routledge Handbook of Marxian Economics, edited by David M. Brennan, David Kristjanson-Gural, Catherine P. Mulder, and Erik K. Olsen.

The handbook contains thirty-seven original essays, including two—“Epistemology” and “Postmodernism”—cowritten with my good friend and frequent collaborator Jack Amariglio.

The handbook is too expensive for most people to buy. But professors and students can ask their college or university to purchase a copy for the library.