Posts Tagged ‘murder’

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blankenship

Don Blankenship, the chief executive of the Massey Energy Company in 2010 when a fire in the Upper Big Branch Mine killed 29 miners—who should have been charged with murder but was earlier only convicted of a federal misdemeanor charge of conspiring to violate mine safety standards and was sentenced by U.S. district judge Irene Berge to one year in prison and fined the maximum of $250,000—has just issued a 67-page diatribe (pdf) in which he declares himself an “American political prisoner.”

In the booklet, Blankenship asserts, contrary to all evidence, that the explosion was triggered by natural gas, and not unsafe mining conditions; politicians imprisoned him for political, self-serving reasons; and he has a long history of working to advance the safety of coal miners.

In a statement to The Associated Press on Wednesday, former U.S. attorney Booth Goodwin called the booklet “more Blankenship propaganda.”

“Blankenship was convicted by a jury of his peers of willfully violating mine safety laws-laws designed to keep miners safe,” said Goodwin, who brought the case against Blankenship. “They are the same laws that if broken, cause deadly mine explosions like the one that tragically killed 29 miners at UBB. Blankenship is in prison because of his greed, his arrogance, and his criminal behavior. This most recent stunt shows that he still has not learned this lesson: if you gamble with miners lives, you deserve to go to prison.” . . .

Goodwin said a convicted criminal who denies his crimes from prison is still a convicted criminal – and still in prison.

“The only difference is that this one has the money to spend a fortune on postage for his denials,” he said.

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Don Blankenship, the chief executive of the Massey Energy Company in 2010 when a fire in the Upper Big Branch Mine killed 29 miners—who should have been charged with murder but was earlier only convicted of a federal misdemeanor charge of conspiring to violate mine safety standards—was sentenced by U.S. district judge Irene Berge to one year in prison and fined the maximum of $250,000.

That comes out to only about twelve or thirteen days in jail for the deaths of each one of those murdered workers.

That’s why Ann Bybee-Finley [ht: ja] has launched the “Making one year count” campaign, calling on people to send letters to Blankenship every day he is in prison:

She wants to show Blankenship how many people he affected and empower West Virginians to speak out against the abuses and influence of the coal industry in their state. . .

“He only gets one year and nothing we can say or do will change that right now. Working with what we got, how can we make this year more meaningful?” Bybee-Finley said. “If we could make it longer, a lot of people would, but we can’t, right now, so we have to take this alternative approach.”

 

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Don Blankenship, the chief executive of the Massey Energy Company in 2010 when a fire in the Upper Big Branch Mine killed 29 miners—who should have been charged with murder but was earlier only convicted of a federal misdemeanor charge of conspiring to violate mine safety standards—was sentenced by U.S. district judge Irene Berge to one year in prison and fined the maximum of $250,000.

As Blankenship left the courthouse, a few family members of miners who were killed started yelling at him while he and his attorneys spoke with reporters.

“We buried our kid because of you,” said Robert Atkins, whose son Jason died in the explosion. “That’s all I got is a goddamn tombstone.” . . .

The judge described Blankenship’s rise from a meager, single-mother Appalachian household to one of the wealthiest, most influential figures in the region and in the coal industry.

“Instead of being to be able to tout you as a success story, we are here as a result of your part in a dangerous conspiracy,” she said.

blakenship

I’ve been following and writing about the saga of Massey Energy and Don Blankenship even since the 5 April 2010 fire in their Upper Big Branch Mine when they killed 29 miners.

Now, Blankenship—who should have been charged with murder—is actually standing trial on three felony counts, including conspiracy to violate mining safety rules, conspiracy to block inspectors from carrying out their duties at the Upper Big Branch mine before the explosion, and misleading financial regulators about his company’s safety record after the explosion.

According to the New York Times,

That he is being prosecuted at all is stunning, given his political clout in a state with a long, sordid history of coal-mine tragedies, stretching back to at least the late 1800s. He spent $5 million to elect one State Supreme Court justice, which prompted a documentary film labeling him “The Kingmaker,” and he was photographed on the French Riviera with another. Both later voted to throw out a $50 million jury verdict against Massey.

“Politicians, Democrats and Republicans, flocked to Blankenship,” said Patrick McGinley, a law professor at West Virginia University who contributed to the state inquiry. “He was viewed by many as untouchable, just like all the other corporate executives of coal companies that killed scores or hundreds or thousands of miners over the last century.”

That’s why the trial itself, regardless of the final verdict, is a sign of change in coal country:

Gary Quarles, a retired miner whose son, Gary Wayne Quarles, 33, died in the blast, was a miner himself. He and his wife, Patty, who has a tattoo on her left ankle of her son wearing his black miner’s hard hat, have been attending the proceedings.

The trial began last week; it is expected to run into November. By the end, Mr. Quarles said, the public will “see what kind of man Don really is.”

Five years after losing their son, the couple would like to see Mr. Blankenship convicted. But seeing him in court — surrounded by lawyers, listening to himself referred to as “the defendant” — is a kind of satisfaction in itself.

 Not enough, perhaps, but change it is.