Posts Tagged ‘Obamacare’


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Elections, of course, have consequences. In the case of Kentucky, Republican Governor-elect Matt Bevin has threatened to dismantle Kynect (the Kentucky version of the Affordable Care Act) and to create a Right to Work state.


Just so we understand what stands to be lost as a result of this election, Kentucky led the nation in the largest drop in the percentage of residents without health insurance from 2013 to 2014.

The percentage of uninsured Kentuckians dropped to 8.5 percent in 2014 from 14.3 percent in 2013. The drop of 5.8 percentage points was double the national decrease of 2.9 percent. The report says 366,000 Kentuckians were uninsured in 2014, down 250,000 from 616,000 in 2013.

The vast majority of the newly insured enrolled in the expanded Medicaid program, which covers previously ineligible individuals whose income is up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level.


In addition, Kentucky (pdf) had 189,000 union members in 2014. (In addition to these members, another 30,000 wage and salary workers in Kentucky were represented by a union on their main job or covered by an employee association or contract while not union members themselves.) Thus, union members accounted for 11.0 percent of wage and salary workers in Kentucky, just under the national average of 11.1 percent.

According to the secretary of state’s office, election turnout in Kentucky was only 30.7 percent. Bevin (with 52 percent of the vote) defeated Democrat Jack Conway (who received 43 percent) to become only the second Republican governor in the state in four decades. Bevin’s election gives Republicans control of the executive branch along with a commanding majority in the state Senate. Democrats still have an eight-seat majority in the state House of Representatives.


The New York Times has mapped the percentage of the U.S. population that still, two years into Obamacare, remains without health insurance.

The remaining uninsured are primarily in the South and the Southwest. They tend to be poor. They tend to live in Republican-leaning states. The rates of people without insurance in the Northeast and the upper Midwest have fallen into the single digits since the Affordable Care Act’s main provisions kicked in. But in many parts of the country, obtaining health insurance is still a problem for many Americans.

Here, for comparison, are some additional maps—starting with slave and free states in 1860, rates of poverty in 2011, and red and blue states in 2014:





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