Posts Tagged ‘protest’


Special mention

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Protest of the day

Posted: 11 September 2016 in Uncategorized
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During the past couple of weeks, the only real India economic news in the Western press was the decision by “the Ranbir Kapoor of banking,” Raghuram G. Rajan, to step down from his position as the head of the Reserve Bank of India.

But we read almost nothing about the 2 September nationwide strike by 150 million Indian workers [ht: Magpie], which was certainly the largest strike in India’s long labor history—and may have been the largest general strike in world history.

As Vijay Prashad explained,

Few front page stories, fewer pictures of marching workers outside their silent factories and banks, tea gardens and bus stations. The sensibility of individual journalists can only rarely break through the wall of cynicism built by the owners of the press and the culture they would like to create. For them, workers’ struggles are an inconvenience to daily life. It is far better for the corporate media to project a strike as a disturbance, as a nuisance to a citizenry that seems to live apart from the workers. It is middle-class outrage that defines the coverage of a strike, not the issues that move workers to take this heartfelt and difficult action. The strike is treated as archaic, as a holdover from another time. It is not seen as a necessary means for workers to voice their frustrations and hopes. The red flags, the slogans and the speeches — these are painted with embarrassment. It is as if turning one’s eyes from them would somehow make them disappear.


This particular protest dates back to 22 May 1816, in Littleport [ht: ja], when about 100 workers left The Globe armed with pitchforks, cleavers, and guns and smashed windows and broke down doors, stealing money, food, and goods from their wealthy neighbors.

The Littleport Riots were not isolated events, but part of “a wave of unrest” from 1815 onwards, according to Anglia Ruskin University historian Rohan McWilliam.

“There was economic dislocation after the end of the Napoleonic Wars and the introduction of the Corn Laws in 1815, which increased taxation on wheat,” he said.

“Labour wages weren’t keeping up with the cost of living, while poor harvests exacerbated the situation.”

Previously common land, on which labourers could grow crops or keep livestock to supplement their wages, was being enclosed by landowners.

Their employment conditions had also changed, said University of Hertfordshire historian Katrina Navickas, to “daily hirings instead of yearly hirings – in essence, the introduction of a type of zero-hours contract”.

This was exacerbated by a breakdown of the Poor Law, which was supposed to help the most vulnerable based on need with small sums of money and “in kind” goods such as shoes. . .

And then to tighten the screw still further, the Game Laws passed in 1816 restricted the hunting of game to landowners, with transportation the penalty for poaching – or even being found in possession of a net at night.

The disturbance broke out when a group of mostly unemployed men met at the Globe Inn, for a meeting of the village Benefit Club.

More than 300 people eventually participated in the riot, which spilled over into Ely and was put down on 24 July by the Cambridgeshire Militia and the 1st (Royal) Regiment of Dragoons.


On 28 June 1816, five men were hanged, “having been convicted of divers Robberies” during the riots.

Protest of the day

Posted: 26 May 2016 in Uncategorized
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[ht: bn]*

Meanwhile, unions (led by the CGT, the Confédération générale du travailare leading strike actions across France at oil refineries, nuclear power stations, ports, and transportation hubs to protest the labor reform bill the government pushed through the National Assembly without a vote.



*Here is a link to the lyrics of the famous Italian partisan song “Bella Ciao.” And another link to the Nuit Debout orchestra’s performance of Verdi’s “Nabucco.”



All but three of Detroit’s 97 schools stayed closed again today, the second day of teacher protests over their pay and the conditions for students in the city’s financially ailing school district.

The protests began on Monday, on Teacher Appreciation Day [ht: sm],

after Detroit Public Schools’ emergency manager Steven Rhodes announced in an email to teachers Friday that the city’s finances were so bad that it wouldn’t be able to make payroll after more than $48 million in state emergency aid runs out on June 30.

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In addition, teachers have tweeted photos of stained ceilings, disgusting bathrooms, and inadequate student lunches.


Rise up at night

Posted: 20 April 2016 in Uncategorized
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The other day, I posted a note about Nuit debout (which loosely translated means “rise up at night”), the “vast nocturnal protest gatherings [that] have spread across France.

Gabriel Rockhill [ht: ja] explains the cultural and political significance of the movement:

This movement stands up—through the night—against the one force known for its worldwide insomnia: capitalism. If it is praised for its supposed productive forces and consumer options or condemned due to its debilitating alienation and environmental degradation, it is generally recognized that the time of capital is 24/7. Although stores or stock exchanges might occasionally close, the sleepless juggernaut of capitalist expansion never tires of extracting profit from the four corners of the globe.

Resistance to the night guardian of this shadowy world, on the contrary, is too often presented as fragmentary and intermittent, when it is not simply ignored as if it were non-existent. Indeed, the latter has been the preferred tactic of the overwhelming majority of the Anglophone media, whose paltry coverage of the events is a testament to their role in promulgating obscurities. When there is attention paid to radical insurgencies, the mass media, professional politicians and well-paid pundits revel in stories with clear beginnings and ends, thereby securing closure in terms of a simple narrative logic that commonly juxtaposes dawning aspirations to dusk-like disappointments. In the beginning, we are frequently told, there was light: individuals in a specific location like Paris suddenly ‘awakened’ one day in order to come together in a collective act of protest. After battling for a specific goal and attracting the supposed daylight provided by corporate media coverage, they then sink back into the abyss from which they came, perhaps leaving things worse than before. Spectators are subtly encouraged to wonder why there was even a protest in the first place, the implicit message being that it is best never to try and change things at all (since they are ultimately unchangeable).

The space and time of insurrection are thereby divided and conquered. Individual instances are separated out in space and terminology: the Indignados Movement, the Arab Spring, the Pots and Pans Protest in Quebec, etc. They are also condensed into precise and circumscribed flashpoints, as has been the case with the problematic reduction of the Occupy movement to Zuccotti Park. They are then inscribed within a temporal framework of original aspirations and final consequences. Everything becomes a question of means and ends: what is the goal and was it attained? The only possible success is thus defined in terms of ‘productive’ results within a delimited space and time, as if the revolutionary transformation of society in totocould be reduced to the same logic as capitalist profit margins. This is indeed the spatiotemporal divide-and-conquer strategy that seeks to narratively incarcerate revolutionary insurrection: the condition of possibility of success is its own failure! To have a so-called productive outcome, it needs to hastily vanish into the instrumentalist logic of striving to reach a single industrious goal within the system in place.

The subliminal message inherent in this narrative structure is that whereas so-called capitalist productivity never sleeps and its tentacles hold the entire world in the loving embrace of fierce competition, resistance to it arises—and can only arise—in brief instances and circumscribed locations with the explicit goal of making minor adjustments to an unquestionable reality. The felicitous label Nuit debout suggests, however, a different story, which concerns the sleepless titan that is worldwide insurgency against the death grip of imperialist and colonial capitalism in the supposedly beneficent age of ‘globalization.’ Like so many of the other movements, it rejects punctual and instrumentalized space-time in favor of a continuous time of occupation and an open space for the convergence of struggles (including those for popular education, the dismantling of the patriarchy, the overcoming of the refugee and immigration crisis, LGBTQ rights, the preservation of the environment, social welfare, and so forth).


An anti-austerity protest has brought 150,000 people—students, workers, and others—to the streets of London to demand David Cameron’s resignation.

The March for Health, Homes, Jobs and Education was organised by activist group the People’s Assembly. The demonstrators called for an end to austerity, and demanded that David Cameron quit over the revelation that he profited from his father’s offshore investment fund. . .

The People’s Assembly used the protest to make “Four Demands”. With regards to health, they called for an end to Government spending cuts and the alleged privatisation of the NHS. The protestors’ demand over housing included rent controls and the protection of social housing.

On jobs, they called for a universal living wage and the scrapping of the Trade Union Bill, and they also demanded an end to student tuition fees and “the marketisation of education”.