Posts Tagged ‘strike’

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, a cook in the U.S. Senate cafeteria, explains why he went on strike with hundreds of other federal contract workers in the nation’s capital today.

Every day, I serve food to some of the most powerful people on earth, including many of the senators who are running for president: I’m a cook for the federal contractor that runs the US Senate cafeteria. But today, they’ll have to get their meals from someone else’s hands, because I’m on strike.

I am walking off my job because I want the presidential hopefuls to know that I live in poverty. Many senators canvas the country giving speeches about creating “opportunity” for workers and helping our kids achieve the “American dream” – most don’t seem to notice or care that workers in their own building are struggling to survive.

I’m a single father and I only make $12 an hour; I had to take a second job at a grocery store to make ends meet. But even though I work seven days a week – putting in 70 hours between my two jobs – I can’t manage to pay the rent, buy school supplies for my kids or even put food on the table. I hate to admit it, but I have to use food stamps so that my kids don’t go to bed hungry.

I’ve done everything that politicians say you need to do to get ahead and stay ahead: I work hard and play by the rules; I even graduated from college and worked as a substitute teacher for five years. But I got laid-off and I now I’m stuck trying to make ends meet with dead-end service jobs.

A National Employment Law Project survey of federal contract workers [pdf] found that, of the workers they interviewed, 74 percent of these workers earned under $10 per hour; nearly 60 percent received no job benefits; and 14 percent are forced to rely on foods stamps to make ends meet.

Protest of the day

Posted: 12 December 2014 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , ,

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Italian workers in more than 50 cities across the country are participating in a general strike today to stop the center-left government’s attempt to “loosen” existing labor laws.

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Belgian workers have opened a month of intermittent strike action by paralyzing the port of Antwerp and slowing train traffic through much of the country.

Monday’s protest action targeted measures by the nation’s business-friendly government to cut into employees’ income, extend working time and restrict social services.

On their first of three Mondays of regional strikes, the unions targeted Antwerp, with Europe’s second biggest port, and made sure no ships could enter of leave the docks. Port workers have been particularly angered by measures to extend the start of pensions by two years.

Port worker Frank Verhulst complained it would force them to work until the age of 67. “But it is a very hard job here,” he said.

Labor action is to culminate in a nationwide strike on Dec. 15.

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Fast-food workers are planning to go on strike this coming Thursday, with a nationwide walkout to protest low wages, poor healthcare, and employers’ attempts to block unionization.

The strike is the latest in a series of increasingly heated confrontations between fast food firms and their workers. Pressure is also mounting on McDonald’s, the largest fast food company, over its relations with its workers and franchisees.

Workers from McDonald’s, Burger King, Pizza Hut and other large chains will strike on Thursday and are planning protests outside stores nationwide, in states including California, Missouri, Wisconsin and New York.

The day of disruption is being coordinated by local coalitions and Fast Food Forward and Fight for 15, union-backed pressure groups which have called for the raising of the minimum wage to $15 an hour for the nation’s four million fast-food workers.

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Up to a million U.K. public sector workers—firefighters, librarians, teachers, and council staff—are expected to participate in today’s strike.

Britain is to witness the biggest round of industrial action for three years as teachers and firefighters join care workers, refuse collectors, librarians and other civil servants at picket lines and rallies across the country. . .

Dave Prentis, general secretary of Unison, representing many of the country’s lowest paid workers, told the BBC: “Something has got to give – enough is enough.

“We’ve got 300,000 now on zero-hours contracts, we’ve got a million workers in local government earning below the living wage that Boris Johnson and others talk about, and people are saying: ‘We cannot go through another three years of this pay restraint.'”

Union leaders say there will be more than 50 marches and rallies across England and Wales including a protest that will end in a rally at Trafalgar Square, London. There will also be scores of picket lines at schools, council offices, depots and fire stations across England and Wales.

 

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Labor union Verdi has called on workers at German warehouses of online retailer Amazon.com to extend their strikes over pay and working conditions on Thursday and Friday of this week.

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Yesterday, the fast-food strikes that have been spreading around the United States went global. Workers at restaurants like Burger King, McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and KFC walked off their jobs in 230 cities around the world to demand a minimum wage of $15 an hour and the right to form a union without retaliation. Strikers protested in 150 US cities, from New York to Los Angeles, and in 80 foreign cities, from Casablanca to Tokyo to Brussels to Buenos Aires.

Currently, the median pay for fast-food workers is just over $9 an hour, or about $18,500 a year. That’s roughly $4,500 lower than the Census Bureau’s poverty threshold level of $23,000 for a family of four.

The “Fight for $15” campaign started in New York in November 2012, when 200 fast-food workers demanded $15 and the right to form a union without retaliation.

Union organizers say the movement has elevated the debate about inequality in the U.S. and helped raise the minimum wage in some states.