Posts Tagged ‘unpaid internships’

Millenials

We all know that the Millennials, notwithstanding their constant battering in the media, are generation screwed.

The members of Generation Y know it, too, which is why they see themselves not as middle-class, but as working-class [ht: ja].

The number of millennials – who are also known as Generation Y and number about 80 million in the US – describing themselves as middle class has fallen in almost every survey conducted every other year, dropping from 45.6% in 2002 to a record low of 34.8% in 2014. In that year, 8% of millennials considered themselves to be lower class and less than 1% considered themselves to be upper class.

The large downshift in class identity among young adults may have helped explain the surprisingly strong performance in Democratic primaries of the insurgent presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, who has promised to scrap college tuition fees and raise minimum wages.

And, as members of the working-class, they’re beginning to challenge their employers over exploitation [ht: ja]. That’s especially true when Millennials are forced to have the freedom to take unpaid internships.

The usual excuse is that, whether on political campaigns or in media outlets, interns are gaining experience, contacts, and references. However,

not everyone believes “experience” or connections are enough of a payout for weeks and months of labour. Over the past five years, former interns at Condé Nast, Harper’s Bazaar, Gawker Media, NBC Universal and Fox Searchlight have filed lawsuits against their employers, accusing them of exploitation.

Clearly, within contemporary capitalism, Millennials are getting screwed—and, as workers, they’re beginning to fight back.

0114tomtoles_univ

Special mention

poor-jamie-dimon 20150114edloc-a_14502642_8col

MPzfH.AuSt.79

Answer (according to Kathleen Madigan):

College football’s “Norma Rae” moment joins other recent pay-related episodes. First was the proposal to raise the federal minimum wage. Next came the White House’s directive to expand the number of workers eligible for overtime pay. Employees who currently work extra hours for free will soon get paid for their time.

Add in interns and citizen journalists that perform duties for free and a trend is evident: The U.S. economy may be the richest in the world, but sections of it depend on cheap or free labor.

September 23, 2013

Special mention

23_edit_toon 137837_600

0*c1NUs6Km2pcAfiJ0

source

A number of the students in my Topics in Political Economy, in writing about Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations, referred to the problems associated with unpaid internships. Clearly, for these juniors and seniors, the pressure to accept unpaid internships is enormous—and troubling.