“Where Do We Go From Here?”

Posted: 21 January 2013 in Uncategorized
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In the summer of 1967, African Americans rioted in the poor neighborhoods of Detroit and Newark. Martin Luther King, Jr. blamed poverty for fueling black anger. He called for a bold plan to help the nation’s poor. When President Lyndon Johnson declared a “war on poverty” in 1964, he launched an array of anti-poverty initiatives. But King believed Johnson’s “Great Society” programs were being bled dry by the vast sums going to the war in Vietnam.

On 16 August 1967, King addressed the annual convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and asked, “where do we go from here?”

Now we must develop progress, or rather, a program—and I can’t stay on this long—that will drive the nation to a guaranteed annual income. Now, early in the century this proposal would have been greeted with ridicule and denunciation as destructive of initiative and responsibility. At that time economic status was considered the measure of the individual’s abilities and talents. And in the thinking of that day, the absence of worldly goods indicated a want of industrious habits and moral fiber. We’ve come a long way in our understanding of human motivation and of the blind operation of our economic system. Now we realize that dislocations in the market operation of our economy and the prevalence of discrimination thrust people into idleness and bind them in constant or frequent unemployment against their will. The poor are less often dismissed, I hope, from our conscience today by being branded as inferior and incompetent. We also know that no matter how dynamically the economy develops and expands, it does not eliminate all poverty.

The problem indicates that our emphasis must be twofold: We must create full employment, or we must create incomes. People must be made consumers by one method or the other. Once they are placed in this position, we need to be concerned that the potential of the individual is not wasted. New forms of work that enhance the social good will have to be devised for those for whom traditional jobs are not available. . .

I want to say to you as I move to my conclusion, as we talk about “Where do we go from here?” that we must honestly face the fact that the movement must address itself to the question of restructuring the whole of American society. (Yes) There are forty million poor people here, and one day we must ask the question, “Why are there forty million poor people in America?” And when you begin to ask that question, you are raising a question about the economic system, about a broader distribution of wealth. When you ask that question, you begin to question the capitalistic economy. (Yes) And I’m simply saying that more and more, we’ve got to begin to ask questions about the whole society. We are called upon to help the discouraged beggars in life’s marketplace. (Yes) But one day we must come to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring. (All right) It means that questions must be raised. And you see, my friends, when you deal with this you begin to ask the question, “Who owns the oil?” (Yes) You begin to ask the question, “Who owns the iron ore?” (Yes) You begin to ask the question, “Why is it that people have to pay water bills in a world that’s two-thirds water?” (All right) These are words that must be said. (All right)

Unfortunately, more than 45 years later, these are words that still must be said.

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Comments
  1. [...] David Ruccio and Glenn Greenwald each draw our attention today to forgotten, overlooked, yet essential aspects of MLK’s legacy; radical economic and anti-militaristic world views. [...]

  2. [...] “Where Do We Go From Here?” In the summer of 1967, African Americans rioted in the poor neighborhoods of Detroit and Newark. [...]

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