Posts Tagged ‘students’

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In the case of the University of Southern Maine, it is an exhibition of courage and steadfastness—and ultimately delight—on the part of both faculty and students who were able to force the administration to rescind the faculty layoffs and to reconsider the other proposed budget cuts that would have destroyed the “people’s university.”

296Hunger0405

As the Washington Post explains,

A problem known as “food insecurity” — a lack of nutritional food — is not typically associated with U.S. college students. But it is increasingly on the radar of administrators, who report seeing more hungry students, especially at schools that enroll a high percentage of youths who are from low-income families or are the first generation to attend college.

At the same time that higher education is seen as key to financial security, tuition and living expenses are rising astronomically, making it all the more tempting for students to cut corners on food.

“Between paying rent, paying utilities and then trying to buy food, that’s where we see the most insecurity because that’s the most flexible,” said Monica Gray, director of programs at the College Success Foundation-District of Columbia, which helps low-income high school students go to college.

As campuses look for solutions, the number of university food pantries has shot up, from four in 2008 to 121 today, according to the Michigan State University Student Food Bank, which has advised other campuses on starting them. Trinity Washington University in the District opened one in September, and the University of Maryland at College Park is looking into opening one.

Update

Apparently, even star “student-athletes”—such as the University of Connecticut’s Shabazz Napier—are going hungry.

Napier recently called the Northwestern union ruling “kind of great” and said that although he appreciates his basketball scholarship, it doesn’t cover all of his expenses.

“I don’t feel student-athletes should get hundreds of thousands of dollars, but like I said, there are hungry nights that I go to bed and I’m starving,” he said.

Asked whether he felt like an employee — a key distinction cited in the labor board’s Northwestern ruling — the Huskies point guard responded, “I just feel like a student-athlete, and sometimes, like I said, there’s hungry nights and I’m not able to eat and I still got to play up to my capabilities. … When you see your jersey getting sold — it may not have your last name on it — but when you see your jersey getting sold and things like that, you feel like you want something in return.”

146863_600

Special mention

146802_600 JvCTD.AuSt.79

Guardian-Cartoon

No, I’m not referring to the ignominious fall of the once-mighty Red Devils.*

Instead, it’s the news that the University of Manchester [ht: adm] has decided to cancel the year-old Bubbles, Panics and Crashes module, which had been developed to answer student protests at the dominance of orthodox free-market teaching.

Students said the U-turn undermined the credibility of senior staff who promised reforms and meant the department was actively obstructing debate over the causes of the financial crash and why economists failed to see it coming. . .

The row broke out last year when students claimed that mainstream economic teaching failed to address the underlying causes of the banking crash, and was in part responsible for politicians and financial watchdogs relying on free-market theories and light-touch regulation.

Undergraduates in Manchester formed the Post-Crash Economics Society and joined groups at the London School of Economics, Cambridge University and University College London to rebel against what they saw as the dominance of discredited theories that rely on mathematical formulas and not real-world examples.

In response, several university departments agreed to implement a new curriculum that would incorporate a wider range of viewpoints, including Keynesian economic thinking. Sponsored by the Institute for New Economic thinking, based in New York, the Curriculum in Open-source Resources in Economics project was set up to develop “a new approach to economics teaching for undergraduates”.

Manchester University’s economics department, which faced the brunt of student criticism, went further when it agreed to run the Bubbles, Panics and Crashes course. The decision to close it down after only one year has dismayed students.

 

*Manchester United Football Club are now seventh in the table, 17 points off the top, less than one year after winning the Premiership by 11 points.

college_football_union_ap_img

Peter Sung Ohr, the regional director of the National Labor Relations Board, ruled today that Northwestern University football players are employees of the school and are therefore entitled to a union election.

The stunning decision has the potential to alter dramatically the world of big-time college sports in which the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the universities strike the deals and set the rules, exerting control over the activities of the players known as “student athletes.”

But now they are employees, too, according to the NLRB decision, which will be appealed.

In siding with the union, Ohr said the football players primarily have an economic relationship with the university, which controls and directs their daily activities and compensates them in the form of scholarships.

“The record makes clear that the Employer’s scholarship players are identified and recruited in the first instance because of their football prowess and not because of their academic achievement in high school,” Ohr wrote.

USMwalkout032414-3-600x400

University of Southern Maine students walked out of class Monday at noon to protest recent faculty layoffs.

The students gathered at the University of Maine School of Law on USM’s Portland campus for a peaceful demonstration to oppose what they are calling unnecessary layoffs. The students are demanding more transparency from the administration.

USM has laid off 12 professors and 14 staff members, with another 10-20 layoffs expected as a result of a $14 million budget shortfall.

The protesters spent the day trying to find a way to reverse the layoffs.

“Because I grew up blue collar, I don’t deserve a classics degree? I don’t deserve an economics degree? I have to wait for them to fish that intellect out-of-state?” said student Brittany Sioux-Goldych.

Economics professor Susan Feiner claims there is no structural gap in USM’s budget and the layoffs are for political reasons.

“Why do you think they want to cut USM? Cheap labor. Cheap labor,” Feiner said at the rally.

Chart of the day

Posted: 26 March 2014 in Uncategorized
Tags: , ,

student debt

According to a new report from the New America Foundation, debt for graduate students in a range of master’s and professional degree programs accounts for the most dramatic increases in student borrowing between 2004 and 2012. About 40 percent of the $1 trillion in outstanding student loans in the United States is financing students who are working toward graduate and professional degrees.

GCS Fig1 GCS Fig 2

Mainstream economists and politicians continue to promote higher education as the solution to all the major economic and social problems in the United States. Meanwhile, as Demos has shown, our nation’s higher education system is being dismantled by state-mandated budget cuts (including staff and faculty layoffs and the elimination of key academic programs) and transformed into a debt-for-diploma system.

The University of Southern Maine is the latest school to announce Draconian budget cuts, the dismantling of some academic programs, and union-busting layoffs even in programs that are not being eliminated—all while engaging in corporate “rebranding” and the creation of new programs such as cybersecurity and entrepreneurship. As one current student wrote:

I am beyond livid with the way these budget cuts are being handled and the way the faculty is being treated. It’s not the faculty’s fault that we dumped thousands of dollars into misspelt and incorrect signs last summer. Or that the basketball coach’s salary and cutting 26 faculty positions just last Spring apparently hasn’t helped. The reality is that the only thing right with this school is the faculty. They seem to be the only people left who care about the students earning an education. Maybe the administration just hasn’t been alerted that we are paying to be educated, not to have pretty classrooms and a better basketball team. We are paying for an education and, if they would be so kind as to give it to us, everyone just might end up content.

Meanwhile, other college campuses are seeing a rise in food pantries [ht: sm] to take care of increasingly impoverished students.

Days after biology major Gillian Carll arrived at Stony Brook University last fall, she encountered a young woman on a bench outside her dormitory who said she had nothing to eat.

“I was just like, ‘Oh, my gosh!’ I didn’t know kids could afford to go here but couldn’t have mac and cheese or something like that,” said the Livonia, N.Y., freshman. “It was kind of unbelievable.”

Carll got the student some food from her dorm room and later volunteered at Stony Brook’s new food pantry — one of dozens cropping up at colleges across the country in recent years as educators acknowledge the struggles many students face as the cost of getting a higher education continues to soar.

“The perception is of college students that if you are able to go to college and you have an opportunity to go to college, you’re part of the haves of this country, not part of the have-nots,” said Beth McGuire-Fredericks, assistant director for college housing at the Stony Brook campus on eastern Long Island and a co-founder of the pantry.

“How can someone who’s in college be someone who has a need like food?”

 

 

Watch this magnificent performance by Rebirth, a poetry ensemble of high-school-age Chicago teens, featuring Simone Allen, Semira Allen, Maya Dru, Adam Ross, Onam Lansana, and Nile Lansana. They are affiliated with the community arts program at the Logan Center.

“Money Has No Heart” was performed on 8 March 2014, during the 2014 Louder Than A Bomb teen poetry festival, organized by Young Chicago Authors. The Olympics-style poetry competition started with 120 teams from the city of Chicago and the suburbs.

the-strip-slide-YX1Q-jumbo

Special mention

obamasocialist_590_396 collegeloans_590_356