Posts Tagged ‘austerity’

US-austerity

We often associate austerity with the economic policies imposed in Europe, especially Greece, since the crash of 2007-08.

However, as the chart above demonstrates (from the Wall Street Journal), the United States has pursued its own version of austerity in the years since the Great Recession began in late 2007. Total state, local and federal government spending, adjusted for inflation, shrank 3.3 percent since the beginning of the recession, compared with an average increase of 23.5 percent over comparable periods in past postwar expansions.

And, of course, the effects of such austerity have been unevenly distributed across the population, with large corporations and wealthy individuals gaining and everyone else finding themselves on the losing end.

deficit_god

Special mention

huck1aug skitso

1795

Special mention

167409_600 167435

slide_445146_5909384_free

Blu, Thessaloniki (24 October 2011)

931727

source

CJXP1MsUwAA_HkH

Special mention

jm071415_COLOR_Greece_Euro__15551413_8col lb0710cd_15527189_8col

CJzJhTtW8AAcnqg

The details of the agreement between Greece and its European creditors are now available. And there’s no doubt about it: this (as the top-trending Twitter hash tag puts it) is a coup. Greece has been forced to surrender (or, given the upcoming debate in parliament, to have the freedom to consider surrendering) a large part of its national sovereignty in exchange for a new European Stability Mechanism program bailout.

Alexis Tsipras [ht: sk] may or may not be a hero, “who fought like a lion against unfathomably large interests” and made it possible for Greece “to live to fight another day.” But that’s really beside the point. So, in the end, is Greek sovereignty—and, for that matter, the humiliating terms sponsored by Germany.

Because what we’re really witnessing is a coup in Europe as a whole. Merkel, Tsipras, Schäuble, and the rest are just the dramatis personae of a series of events that have turned the European project against its own people.

The dream, of course, was to expand democracy, eliminate national rivalries, and promote universal prosperity. But now the European project has become a nightmare of enforcing the conditions of creating and capturing profits—of large enterprises and banks—across an entire continent. And anything that gets in the way—whether existing pensions and state-owned enterprises or rehiring doctors, nurses, and cleaning women—will be sacrificed on the altar of those free-flowing profits.

And who are the losers? The hundreds of millions of workers, farmers, students, young people, and children who are being forced to endure extraordinary levels of unemployment, poverty, and economic insecurity in order to promote a post-2008 recovery that is benefiting only a tiny minority across the continent. And that’s just as true in Germany as in Greece, in England as in Spain. Not to the same degree, of course. But the current negotiations over Greek debt—in which all of their leaders and finance ministers have participated and to which they have given their assent—have demonstrated to the working people of Europe that nothing will be allowed to stand in the way of the interests of the free deployment of capital under conditions that are administered by the troika.

And if an entire nation has to be humiliated in order to serve as an example, so be it. . .

tumblr_nr88fntR0y1qcxeloo1_1280

Special mention

166263_600 68836576-189d-4b14-8acf-3000c83672eb-2060x1406