unequal representations

graphic representations of inequality, in the United States and around the world. . .

> I assemble a presentation on inequality on a regular basis for my Principles of Microeconomics course. Here are links to the latest one, from Fall 2010, as a pdf document, a Powerpoint presentation, and a Quicktime movie.

> Here are links to posts about inequality on this blog.

> The following are some other representations of inequality (please feel free to send me additional ones):

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

source

Comments
  1. [...] unequal representations ← Murder in the coal fields [...]

  2. [...] מעביר קורס על הגידול באי השיוויון בארה"ב ומציג באתר שלו כל מיני אינפוגרפיקות מעניינות בנושא . לפעמים גרף אחד [...]

  3. Magpie says:

    David,

    This is an amazing resource. I’ll make sure my comrades and mates Down Under see it.

    Thanks for making it available.

    Marco (The Magpie)

  4. [...] on economics, politics, and society (most recently, here and here), and he maintains a page on unequal representations which is a collection of graphic representations of inequality. This is especially important today, [...]

  5. Peter says:

    Thanks, David. This is information that must be presented again and again. I’m re-posting it to my friends and students. One problem we face, however, is getting it circulating outside the circle of those who already know. In any case, this post is a great service, as it collects a lot of important data into one place and presents it in easily comprehensible forms.

    • David Ruccio says:

      Dear Peter, I’m glad you find the information useful. I’ve just updated the presentation I use in my Principles of Microeconomics course, which is now available from links at the top of the page in 3 formats: pdf, Powerpoint, and Quicktime.

  6. [...] Homeaboutcrisis representationsunequal representations [...]

  7. [...] Ruccio posted an excellent series of charts on inequality (pdf, ppt, and mov links at the top). For [...]

  8. [...] Dame econ professor David Ruccio has put together a fantastic presentation for his macroeconomics course (via @interfluidity) regarding wealth and inequality in the US, and how it [...]

  9. David Larsson says:

    David,

    Your Bowdoin classmate Dave Larsson here. Read about this via Steve Randy Waldman a/k/a interfluidity on Twitter. Graphic, in every sense of the word.

    Cheers,
    Dave Larsson

  10. Profidia says:

    Assemblies of credible charts like this are invaluable with students. Most are more interested in ‘pictures’ than in numbers, so this is a big help getting the message across, thanks. You can bet I’ll put it to good use.

  11. [...] Homeaboutcrisis representationsunequal representations [...]

  12. [...] Image: David Ruccio [...]

  13. sreaves32 says:

    [...] David Ruccio [...]

  14. G says:

    What appears to be missing is charts indicating income mobility. From 1996 -2005, less than half of those in the top 1% remained in the top 1%. In the same time period, roughly half of tax payers in the bottom income quintile raised to a higher income quintile. Median incomes of all taxpayers increased by 24 percent after adjusting for inflation. The real incomes of two-thirds of all taxpayers increased over this period. In addition, the median incomes of those initially in the lower income groups increased more than the median incomes of those initially in the higher income groups. These statistics were very comparable to a similar study covering 1986-1995. (source: United States Department of the Treasury Income Mobility Study)

  15. David F. Ruccio says:

    And what’s missing from your account, G, are two things: First, income mobility in the United States is decreasing and is less than in many other advanced capitalist countries (witness the kerfuffle concerning the Great Gatsby curve). Second, if there is income mobility (within and/or between generations), it is still the case that it’s mobility between highly unequal income groups. In other words, the existence of mobility doesn’t eliminate the problem of inequality or of classes.

    • Magpie says:

      Prof. Ruccio,

      There is also one issue with the Income Mobility Study. To be fair, I suppose this limitation is inevitable and inherent to data originating from tax returns: taxpayers tend to evade taxes by understating their incomes.

      This, for instance, is openly acknowledged by The World Top Incomes Database, that also works with taxation data (see here: http://g-mond.parisschoolofeconomics.eu/topincomes/#Introduction).

      (Incidentally, the Income Mobility Study does not warn against this, although they do mention that the 2005 figures are incomplete, in the Technical Appendix, starting in page 18).

      Further, not all taxpayers are equally capable (or indeed have the same incentive) to evade taxes. The World Top Incomes Database, for instance, warns that higher income earners have more incentives and means to provide underestimates of their incomes.

      All of this means that the inequality figures obtained should be considered as conservative estimates. Therefore, measures of mobility could overestimate actual mobility: the real upper cutoff point for one quintile, for example, could be considerably higher than the figure estimated from the tax returns.

      In other words: even if a taxpayer’s income increased in the measure estimated, the increase could be insufficient to take this taxpayer to the following quintile.

  16. Occupy Wall Street, Zuccotti Park and I | elcidharth says:

    [...] David Ruccio [...]

  17. Dismayed says:

    I’d love to see updated charts.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s